How to Gain the Appropriate Weight in Pregnancy1

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Know the appropriate weight gain during pregnancy for your size and height.,
Understand why it is important to pay attention to weight gain during pregnancy.,
Recognize how much weight you should gain during each trimester of your pregnancy.,
Realize that weight gain during pregnancy is a necessary part of the experience and not all of the weight gain is being stored as fat.,
Understand the recommended dietary breakdown for women during pregnancy.

You should gain 25 to 35 pounds during pregnancy if you were of a healthy weight before pregnancy, with a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 18.5 to 24.9.You may gain more if you were underweight before pregnancy, with a BMI of less than 18.5. It’s not unusual for women in this category to add 28 to 40 pounds during pregnancy.A woman who is overweight before becoming pregnant with a BMI of 25 to 29.9 should gain 15 to 25 pounds.A woman considered obese with a BMI over 30 should gain 11 to 20 pounds.Your doctor may recommend you gain more or less weight during pregnancy depending on your particular health situation.
Note that, on average, most women have trouble gaining too much weight during pregnancy as opposed to too little. However, both problems do exist, and this article will provide suggestions both for gaining more weight as well as gaining less weight, depending upon which scenario applies to you.;
, It is not only for the baby’s best interest, but for yours as well in navigating the postpartum (post-pregnancy) period.While it is important for your baby to have adequate nutrition to grow and thrive, too much weight can also be harmful for the baby. This can lead to large infants and complications that can arise later in the baby’s life due to elevated birth weight, such as a higher likelihood of childhood obesity and a greater chance of developing diabetes.Similarly, while the mother needs to ensure adequate calories to fuel the growth of the baby, gaining too much excess weight in pregnancy can make it challenging to lose the weight after the pregnancy is over. It can also increase the mother’s chances of diabetes, heart disease, and obesity among other long-term health consequences.Note that you should not lose weight in pregnancy. If you notice weight loss, see your physician immediately for assessment, as this may indicate complications for the pregnancy or trouble in your baby’s ability to grow. However, it can be common to lose a little weight in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy.

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You should gain a total of two to four pounds in the first trimester. After that, you should gain about one pound per week.
Your caloric requirements increase as each trimester goes along. In the second trimester it is recommended to eat approximately 340 calories above your normal amount (pre-pregnancy), and in the third trimester 452 calories above your normal amount (pre-pregnancy).Know, however, that these values are averages and there will be slight differences from woman to woman, depending on her pre-pregnancy weight as well as her general health and metabolism.

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About seven to eight pounds of your pregnancy weight gain will be the baby. In addition, one to two pounds will make up the placenta, one to two pounds will be amniotic fluid, one or so pounds will be breast tissue, two or so pounds will be due to a larger uterus, two to three pounds in extra fluid stored in your body, and two to three extra pounds will be from a larger blood supply.By the end of pregnancy, the average woman is 27 or 28 pounds heavier than she was prior to pregnancy., On average, women need to consume 300 more calories per day during pregnancy than they did prior to becoming pregnant.It is important to have the proper proportions of various nutrients in order to optimize your baby’s growth. The current medical guidelines suggest a diet comprised of 20% protein, 30% fat, and 50% carbohydrates.To break it down based on the food pyramid, an example of a healthy diet during pregnancy would look as follows: 6-11 servings of grains, 3-5 servings of vegetables, 2-4 servings of fruit, 3-4 servings of dairy, and 2-3 servings of meats, beans, or nuts.Note that whole grains (and non-refined sources of carbohydrates) are a better choice, especially when it comes to keeping your blood sugars in a healthy range.

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